Sunday, May 15, 2016

Rock Around the Comet Clock with Hubble

Rock Around the Comet Clock with Hubble:



Views of the rotating jet in comet 252P/LINEAR on April 4, 2016. Credit: Credit: NASA, ESA, and J.-Y. Li (Planetary Science Institute)


Remember 252P/LINEAR? This comet appeared low in the morning sky last month and for a short time grew bright enough to see with the naked eye from a dark site. 252P swept closest to Earth on March 21, passing just 3.3 million miles away or about 14 times the distance between our planet and the moon. Since then, it's been gradually pulling away and fading though it remains bright enough to see in small telescope during late evening hours.







While amateurs set their clocks to catch the comet before dawn, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured close-up photos of it two weeks after closest approach. The images reveal a narrow, well-defined jet of dust ejected by the comet's fragile, icy nucleus spinning like a water jet from a rotating lawn sprinkler. These observations also represent the closest celestial object Hubble has observed other than the moon.







Sunlight warms a comet's nucleus, vaporizing ices below the surface. In a confined space, the pressure of the vapor builds and builds until it finds a crack or weakness in the comet's crust and blasts into space like water from a whale's blowhole. Dust and other gases go along for the ride. Some of the dust drifts back down to coat the surface, some into space to be shaped by the pressure of sunlight into a dust tail.







You can still see 252P/LINEAR if you have a 4-inch or larger telescope. Right now it's a little brighter than magnitude +9 as it slowly arcs along the border of Ophiuchus and Hercules. With the moon getting brighter and brighter as it fills toward full, tonight and tomorrow night will be best for viewing the comet. After that you're best to wait till after the May 21st full moon when darkness returns to the evening sky. 252P will spend much of the next couple weeks near the 3rd magnitude star Kappa Ophiuchi, a convenient guidepost for aiming your telescope in the comet's direction.







While you probably won't see any jets in amateur telescopes, they're there all the same and helped created this comet's distinctive and large, fuzzy coma. Happy hunting!









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