Friday, September 30, 2011

Halo Solar Distrito Federal Goias Brasil 30-09-2011

Halo Solar Distrito Federal Goias Brasil 30-09-2011


Halo Solar Distrito Federal Goias Brasil 30-09-2011 - Google Images Google Pictures



É um jogo? é um hit da Beyoncé? Não, meus amigos, é um halo solar, quando as nuvens estão cheias de cristais de gelo e criam um círculo ao redor de nossa estrela maior. E o fenômeno está acontecendo aqui no Brasil, mais exatamente no Distrito Federal, com resquício para os moradores de Goiás.

NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Scenic Country Farm

Scenic Country Farm:
Scenic Country Farm
A scenic country farm late in the evening after an afternoon of steamy summer rain showers. Beautiful wild flowers blossom in front of an old country barbed wire fence. In the distance cattle graze in the field on the moist green grass. A few scenic barns in the distance give a lovable down home country feel to the landscape.
    Camera Model: ntry-Farm | ForestWander Nature Photography: :08:02 20:27:09 | ForestWander: ure Photography |


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Colors Mountain Sunset

Autumn Colors Mountain Sunset:

Vibrant fall colors across the trees in upon the mountain tops glow in the evening sun. The clouds above highlight the last glimpses of the autumn sun at the end of the day. Picture Height: 3744 pixels | Picture Width: 5616 pixels | Lens Aperture: f/4 | Image Exposure Time: 1/30 sec | Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm | Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV | Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II | Photo White Balance: 0 | Color Space: sRGB |
Autumn Colors Mountain Sunset
Vibrant fall colors across the trees in upon the mountain tops glow in the evening sun. The clouds above highlight the last glimpses of the autumn sun at the end of the day.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels | Picture Width: 5616 pixels | Lens Aperture: f/4 | Image Exposure Time: 1/30 sec | Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm | Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV | Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II | Photo White Balance: 0 | Color Space: sRGB |


Getting to Know the Giant Asteroid

Getting to Know the Giant Asteroid:
By Marc Rayman

As NASA’s Dawn spacecraft investigates its first target, the giant asteroid Vesta, Marc Rayman, Dawn’s chief engineer, shares a monthly update on the mission’s progress.

Latest Image of Vesta captured by Dawn on July 17, 2011

This anaglyph image of Vesta’s equator was put together from two clear filter images, taken on July 24, 2011 by the framing camera instrument aboard NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. The anaglyph image shows hills, troughs, ridges and steep craters. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

› Full image and caption | › Read related news release















Dear Magdawnificents,

Dawn has completed the first phase of its exploration of Vesta with tremendous success, and the peripatetic adventurer is now in powered flight again, on its way to a new location from which to scrutinize its subject. Meanwhile, scientists are deeply engaged in analyzing the magnificent views the stalwart surveyor has transmitted to Earth.

Most of August was devoted to survey orbit. At an altitude of about 2,700 kilometers (1,700 miles), the ship sailed slowly around the world beneath it, completing a loop every 69 hours. Vesta rotates faster, turning once on its axis each 5 hours, 20 minutes. As we saw in the previous log, the survey orbit phase of the mission consisted of seven revolutions around Vesta, providing ample opportunities to acquire the rich bounty of data that scientists yearned for.

As Dawn follows its course, it passes over the north pole, then heads south on the day side of Vesta. On each orbit, it trained its sensors on the illuminated surface and filled its memory with the spectacular sights. On the other half of its orbit, gliding high above the dark landscape, it radioed its findings to distant Earth.

As we discussed last year, Vesta has seasons, just as your planet probably does. For readers on Earth, for example, it is summer in the northern hemisphere, and a region around the south pole is in constant darkness. On Vesta right now, the southern hemisphere is facing the sun, so everywhere between about 52 degrees north latitude and the north pole is in a long night. That ten percent of the surface is presently impossible to see. Because Dawn will stay in orbit around Vesta as together they travel around the sun, in 2012 it will be able to see some of this hidden scenery as the seasons advance.

The campaign of acquiring data in survey orbit was very complex. On the second, fourth, fifth, and sixth loops, the strategy included collecting more than Dawn’s memory could accommodate in the half of an orbit in which it was over sunlit terrain. Therefore, during those orbits, mission planners incorporated instructions to turn away from looking at Vesta to allow the spacecraft to point its main antenna to Earth for five to six hours. That provided time to transmit enough of its precious findings to make room for still more during the rest of the passage over the day side.

On the first and third revolutions, the computer in the visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) encountered an unexpected condition, so it stopped collecting data. When the spacecraft was next on the night side, controllers reconfigured the instrument so it could resume normal operation for the subsequent lap. Engineers and scientists from Italy who developed the complex device and from JPL are working closely together to establish the underlying cause. They have taken advantage of the extended periods in each orbit when the main antenna is pointing to Earth to run diagnostic tests on the unit. All indications are that it is healthy, and evidence points strongly to the glitches being related to some detail of the mode in which VIR collects and processes data. The team is confident that once they understand the behavior, they will be able to formulate plans to operate the spectrometer in ways that avoid triggering it.

Thanks to the strategy to perform more observations than needed, even with the interruptions, VIR accumulated a fantastic wealth of information. The principal scientific objective of survey orbit was to collect 5,000 sets of spectra or “frames.” A spectrum is the intensity of light at different wavelengths, and each frame consists of visible and infrared spectra at 256 locations on Vesta’s complex and mysterious surface. By the end of survey orbit, Dawn had obtained well in excess of 13,000 frames, or more than three million spectra. Acquiring more than one spectrum of the same location is valuable, as different angles of incident or reflected sunlight allow scientists to gain greater insight into the mineralogical composition and properties of the material. With an initial plan of observing 52 percent of the surface with VIR from survey orbit, the team is elated now to have spectra from about 63 percent.

The science camera has similarly overachieved. The intent was to photograph 60 percent of Vesta, but the entire 90 percent not in the darkness of northern winter has been captured at least five times. With pictures taken from multiple angles, stereo views can be constructed; and images at different times allow features to be observed under varied lighting conditions. All of the camera’s color filters were used, providing coverage in the near infrared and visible. Until recently, Vesta was known as little more than a smudge of light, but now scientists have more than 2,800 photos from Dawn’s survey.

A selection of stunning scenes of the latest world to come into the realm of humankind’s knowledge is here. As scientists pore through the treasure trove, they will continue to add their favorite views to that site.

This mission has already revealed far more about Vesta than a flyby mission could. While much more data will be obtained during the rest of Dawn’s residence there, the six gigabytes from VIR and the three gigabytes from the camera so far are enough to keep researchers busy (and extremely happy!) for a very long time as they tease out the nature of this alien world.

› Continue reading Marc Rayman’s September Dawn Journal


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

In a State of Flux

In a State of Flux:

By Amber Jenkins


This post was written for My Big Fat Planet, a blog hosted by Amber Jenkins on NASA’s Global Climate Change site.


Latest Image of Vesta captured by Dawn on July 17, 2011

COLD SNAP: Petermann Glacier, Greenland. Left: June 26, 2010. Right: August 13, 2010. An iceberg more than four times the size of Manhattan broke off the Petermann Glacier (the curved, nearly vertical stripe stretching up from the bottom right of the images) along the northwestern coast of Greenland. Warmer water below the floating ice and at the sea’s surface were probably responsible for the break.

› See more images of our changing Earth from State of Flux
















They say a picture says a thousand words. This week we published our 100th image in State of Flux, our gallery showing images of change around our planet. So hopefully by now you’re in awe of our home planet and the ways in which it is constantly changing, and aware of the impact us humans can have.


Each week for the past couple of years, we’ve published new images of different locations on planet Earth, showing change over time periods ranging from centuries to days. The pictures have been taken from space, by NASA’s Eyes on the Earth (its fleet of satellites whizzing above our heads), and from the ground, by real-life people. Some of the changes seen are related to, or exacerbated by, climate change, and some are not. Some document the effects of urbanization and man’s impact on the land, while others the ravage of disasters such as fires and floods.


Seeing our planet from space gives us a global view that we can’t get elsewhere. Through those eyes, we’ve witnessed damage caused by the recent tsunami in Japan, glacier melt in the Himalayas, the greening of China, the growth of Las Vegas and a century of global warming. We’ve looked at the march of deforestation in Bolivia, the rumblings of the (unpronounceable) Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull, and the damming of the River Nile. Take a look below at some of our favorites. Sign up to our monthly newsletter or subscribe to our Facebook page if you want to keep up to date with our latest images. We’ll be launching a brand spanking new version of the gallery soon!


See more of some of the most stunning images from State of Flux on My Big Fat Planet.



NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

The Giant Asteroid, Up Close and Personal

The Giant Asteroid, Up Close and Personal:
By Marc Rayman

As NASA’s Dawn spacecraft investigates its first target, the giant asteroid Vesta, Marc Rayman, Dawn’s chief engineer, shares a monthly update on the mission’s progress.

Image of the giant asteroid Vesta by Dawn

This image obtained by the framing camera on NASA’s Dawn spacecraft shows the south pole of the giant asteroid Vesta. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

› Full image and caption | › Read related news release















Dear Dawnniversaries,

Dawn’s fourth anniversary of being in space is very different from its previous ones. Indeed, those days all were devoted to reaching the distant destination the ship is now exploring. Celebrating its anniversary of leaving Earth, Dawn is in orbit around a kindred terrestrial-type world, the ancient protoplanet Vesta.

The adventurer spent August on Vesta’s shores and now it’s ready to dive in. Dawn devoted most of this month to working its way down from the 2,700-kilometer (1,700-mile) survey orbit to its current altitude of about 680 kilometers (420 miles) and changing the orientation of the orbit. (For a more detailed discussion of the altitude, go here.) The sensationally successful observing campaign in survey orbit produced captivating views, revealing a complex, fascinating landscape. Now four times closer to the surface, the probe is nearly ready for an even more comprehensive exploration from the high altitude mapping orbit (HAMO). The plans for HAMO have changed very little since it was described on the third anniversary of Dawn’s launch.

Dawn’s spiral descent went extremely well. We have seen before that bodies travel at higher velocities in lower altitude orbits, where the force of gravity is greater. For example, Mercury hurtles around the sun faster than Earth in order to balance the stronger pull of gravity, and Earth’s speed is greater than that of more remote Vesta. Similarly, satellites in close orbits around Earth, such as the International Space Station, race around faster than the much more distant moon. When it began its spiral on August 31, Dawn’s orbital speed high above Vesta was 76 meters per second (170 mph), and each revolution took nearly 69 hours. Under the gentle thrust of its ion propulsion system, the spacecraft completed 18 revolutions of Vesta, the loops getting tighter and faster as the orbital altitude gradually decreased, until it arrived at its new orbit on schedule on Sept. 18. In HAMO, Dawn orbits at 135 meters per second (302 mph), circling the world beneath it every 12.3 hours.

When Dawn’s itinerary called for it to stop thrusting, it was very close to HAMO but not quite there yet. As mission planners had recognized long beforehand, small differences between the planned and the actual flight profiles were inevitable. Extensive and sophisticated analysis has been undertaken in recent years to estimate the size of such discrepancies so the intricate plans for completing all the work at Vesta could account for the time and the work needed to deliver the robotic explorer to the intended destination. In order to accomplish the intensive program of observations with its scientific instruments, the spacecraft must follow an orbital path carefully matched to the sequences of commands already developed with painstaking attention to detail. The beauty of Dawn’;s artistically choreographed pas de deux with Vesta depends on the music and the movements being well synchronized.

During its descent, Dawn paused frequently to allow controllers to update the flight profile, accounting for some of the variances in its course along the way. Following the completion of thrusting, navigators tracked the ship more extensively as it sailed around Vesta, measuring its orbit with great accuracy. This revealed not only the details of the orbital parameters (such as size, shape, and orientation) but also more about the character of Vesta’s gravity field than could be detected at higher altitudes. With the new information, the team designed two short maneuvers to adjust the orbit. The first, lasting four hours, was executed last night, and the second, half an hour shorter, will be completed tonight. After further measurements to verify the final orbit, the month of HAMO observations will begin on Sept. 29.

› Continue reading Marc Rayman’s Dawn Journal


Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Time : Google Stories

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Time:
Google Stories

Ten Things Everyone Should Know About Time : Google Stories



“Time” is the most used noun in the English language, yet it remains a mystery. We’ve just completed an amazingly intense and rewarding multidisciplinary conference on the nature of time, and my brain is swimming with ideas and new questions. Rather than trying a summary (the talks will be online soon), here’s my stab at a top ten list partly inspired by our discussions: the things everyone should know about time. [Update: all of these are things I think are true, after quite a bit of deliberation. Not everyone agrees, although of course they should.]

1. Time exists. Might as well get this common question out of the way. Of course time exists — otherwise how would we set our alarm clocks? Time organizes the universe into an ordered series of moments, and thank goodness; what a mess it would be if reality were complete different from moment to moment. The real question is whether or not time is fundamental, or perhaps emergent. We used to think that “temperature” was a basic category of nature, but now we know it emerges from the motion of atoms. When it comes to whether time is fundamental, the answer is: nobody knows. My bet is “yes,” but we’ll need to understand quantum gravity much better before we can say for sure.

2. The past and future are equally real. This isn’t completely accepted, but it should be. Intuitively we think that the “now” is real, while the past is fixed and in the books, and the future hasn’t yet occurred. But physics teaches us something remarkable: every event in the past and future is implicit in the current moment. This is hard to see in our everyday lives, since we’re nowhere close to knowing everything about the universe at any moment, nor will we ever be — but the equations don’t lie. As Einstein put it, “It appears therefore more natural to think of physical reality as a four dimensional existence, instead of, as hitherto, the evolution of a three dimensional existence.”

3. Everyone experiences time differently. This is true at the level of both physics and biology. Within physics, we used to have Sir Isaac Newton’s view of time, which was universal and shared by everyone. But then Einstein came along and explained that how much time elapses for a person depends on how they travel through space (especially near the speed of light) as well as the gravitational field (especially if its near a black hole). From a biological or psychological perspective, the time measured by atomic clocks isn’t as important as the time measured by our internal rhythms and the accumulation of memories. That happens differently depending on who we are and what we are experiencing; there’s a real sense in which time moves more quickly when we’re older.

4. You live in the past. About 80 milliseconds in the past, to be precise. Use one hand to touch your nose, and the other to touch one of your feet, at exactly the same time. You will experience them as simultaneous acts. But that’s mysterious — clearly it takes more time for the signal to travel up your nerves from your feet to your brain than from your nose. The reconciliation is simple: our conscious experience takes time to assemble, and your brain waits for all the relevant input before it experiences the “now.” Experiments have shown that the lag between things happening and us experiencing them is about 80 milliseconds. (Via conference participant David Eagleman.)

5. Your memory isn’t as good as you think. When you remember an event in the past, your brain uses a very similar technique to imagining the future. The process is less like “replaying a video” than “putting on a play from a script.” If the script is wrong for whatever reason, you can have a false memory that is just as vivid as a true one. Eyewitness testimony, it turns out, is one of the least reliable forms of evidence allowed into courtrooms. (Via conference participants Kathleen McDermott and Henry Roediger.)

6. Consciousness depends on manipulating time. Many cognitive abilities are important for consciousness, and we don’t yet have a complete picture. But it’s clear that the ability to manipulate time and possibility is a crucial feature. In contrast to aquatic life, land-based animals, whose vision-based sensory field extends for hundreds of meters, have time to contemplate a variety of actions and pick the best one. The origin of grammar allowed us to talk about such hypothetical futures with each other. Consciousness wouldn’t be possible without the ability to imagine other times. (Via conference participant Malcolm MacIver.)

7. Disorder increases as time passes. At the heart of every difference between the past and future — memory, aging, causality, free will — is the fact that the universe is evolving from order to disorder. Entropy is increasing, as we physicists say. There are more ways to be disorderly (high entropy) than orderly (low entropy), so the increase of entropy seems natural. But to explain the lower entropy of past times we need to go all the way back to the Big Bang. We still haven’t answered the hard questions: why was entropy low near the Big Bang, and how does increasing entropy account for memory and causality and all the rest? (We heard great talks by David Albert and David Wallace, among others.)

8. Complexity comes and goes. Other than creationists, most people have no trouble appreciating the difference between “orderly” (low entropy) and “complex.” Entropy increases, but complexity is ephemeral; it increases and decreases in complex ways, unsurprisingly enough. Part of the “job” of complex structures is to increase entropy, e.g. in the origin of life. But we’re far from having a complete understanding of this crucial phenomenon. (Talks by Mike Russell, Richard Lenski, Raissa D’Souza.)

9. Aging can be reversed. We all grow old, part of the general trend toward growing disorder. But it’s only the universe as a whole that must increase in entropy, not every individual piece of it. (Otherwise it would be impossible to build a refrigerator.) Reversing the arrow of time for living organisms is a technological challenge, not a physical impossibility. And we’re making progress on a few fronts: stem cells, yeast, and even (with caveats) mice and human muscle tissue. As one biologist told me: “You and I won’t live forever. But as for our grandkids, I’m not placing any bets.”

10. A lifespan is a billion heartbeats. Complex organisms die. Sad though it is in individual cases, it’s a necessary part of the bigger picture; life pushes out the old to make way for the new. Remarkably, there exist simple scaling laws relating animal metabolism to body mass. Larger animals live longer; but they also metabolize slower, as manifested in slower heart rates. These effects cancel out, so that animals from shrews to blue whales have lifespans with just about equal number of heartbeats — about one and a half billion, if you simply must be precise. In that very real sense, all animal species experience “the same amount of time.” At least, until we master #9 and become immortal. (Amazing talk by Geoffrey West.)



Thursday, September 29, 2011

Hidden Secrets in The Galactic Center of The Milky Way

Hidden Secrets in The Galactic Center of The Milky Way:






A Supermassive Black Hole Disguised by Sagittarius A



The Galactic Center is the rotational center of our home galaxy. It is located in the direction of the Sagittarius, Ophiuchus, and Scorpius Constellations where the Milky Way shines the most. It has been theorized that the Galactic Center is also home for a supermassive black hole.


Because interstellar dust conceal the Galactic Center, studies at visible, ultraviolet or soft X-ray wavelengths are impossible to conduct. However, observations at gamma ray, hard X-ray, infrared, sub-millimetre and radio wavelengths provide a substantial amount of information. The existence of the supermassive black hole has been confirmed using a VLT (Very Large Telescope) facility. Also accretion of gas onto a black hole would release enough energy to power up the intense compact radio source (Sagittarius A*), which is part of a larger astronomical radio source (Sagittarius A), and is located at the same location as the supermassive black hole.


Scientists were surprised to find out that the Galactic Center contains not only old red main-sequence stars, but also high amounts of massive stars. The birth of those stars was triggered a few millions years ago. This creates a “youth paradox” because the black hole tidal forces would prevent such a star formation event to take place. One explanation for this enigma is that the stars migrated near the Galactic Center after they formed in a remote location like a star cluster or a massive gas cloud near the black hole.


The Galactic Center is a quiet place for the next 200 million years when a star birth event will commence. Many stars will rush to supernovae states at higher rates (100x) than the current rate. The starburst may also be accompanied by the formation of galactic jets as matter falls into the central black hole. The Galactic Center of the Milky Way undergoes a starburst of this sort every 500 million years.


Distance from Earth: ~ 27000 light years.



Click below for full resolution picture of The Galactic Center


Galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy









NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

FAB-Esquadrilha da Fumaça- Lagoa Santa, MG

FAB-Esquadrilha da Fumaça- Lagoa Santa, MG

fantasy-angel-wallpaper-hot-images

fantasy-angel-wallpaper-hot-images:


fantasy-angel-wallpaper-hot-images





Angel Wallpapers | Fallen Angel Wallpapers | Fairy Wallpapers

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Waterfalls Forest Landscape

Waterfalls Forest Landscape:


Waterfalls Forest Landscape
Waterfalls Forest Landscape


Waterfalls cascade across the forest landscape. Just below a very high waterfall in the blue ridge mountains of Virginia these smaller waterfalls highlight the landscape creating a beautiful waterfall landscape scene.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/11.3 Image Exposure Time: 7/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander Nature Photography ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Heavenly Snow Clouds Mountains

Heavenly Snow Clouds Mountains:
Heavenly Snow Clouds Mountains

Heavenly Snow Clouds powder the Shenandoah Mountains with snow like sugar. God asked Job: Hast thou entered into the treasures of the snow? or hast thou seen the treasures of the hail? In every snow flake there is a different pattern. It is amazing that the Lord knows every pattern of every snow flake that has ever fallen.

    Camera Model: ountains ForestWander Nature Photography: :08:13 22:47:45 ForestWander: restWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Country Mill Summertime Flowers

Country Mill Summertime Flowers:
Country Mill Summertime Flowers

A country mill in the distance surrounded by trees in the summertime. Beautiful Rhododendron flowers in full bloom seem to pop off the screen with sharp focus and contrast.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/8 Image Exposure Time: 1/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Red Daisy Macro on Black

Red Daisy Macro on Black:

Red Daisy Macro on Black
Red Daisy Macro on Black
Make sure to download the full size image of this one. The flower pistols in the middle are in stunning macro detail. All of the surrounding vegetation has been removed to make this nearly perfect red daisy stand out from the contrasted black background.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/15 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Summer Sunrise Mountain Flowers

Summer Sunrise Mountain Flowers:
Summer Sunrise Mountain Flowers

Mountain laurel flowers are beginning to bloom in the high peaks of the Dolly Sods wilderness. Early in the morning as the sun is breaking through the early morning clouds the flowers eagerly await the warmth of the bright rays.

    Camera Model: n-flowers ForestWander Nature Photography: :08:20 20:08:57 ForestWander: restWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Heavenly Snow Shenandoah Mountains

Heavenly Snow Shenandoah Mountains:
Heavenly Snow Shenandoah Mountains

Snow falling late in the winter in the Shenandoah mountains. Far in the distance you can see the snow showers falling on the mountain range across the valley down below.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/6.7 Image Exposure Time: 1/250 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 102 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Focus Mode: AI Focus Lens Model: EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: High Photo White Balance: Auto Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander:


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Blue Anemone Flower

Blue Anemone Flower:
Blue Anemone Flower

This blue flower looks almost like a sea anemone. The light blue color is almost a baby blue with a purple tint. The small groups of blue blossoms on this flower with blue pistils make this a unique floral display.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/38.1 Image Exposure Time: 1/8 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 183 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Yellow Flower

Yellow Flower:
Yellow Flower

A large yellow flower up close. This beautiful yellow flower is in full bloom in the early summer. Flower like this are seen in many flower gardens and landscapes this time of year.

    Picture Height: 2274 pixels Picture Width: 2386 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/6 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 105 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Red Petunia

Red Petunia:
Red Petunia

A red petunia flower. The lighting is simply perfect around this red petunia providing a rich and colorful flower picture.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/38.1 Image Exposure Time: 1/6 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 209 mm Photo Exposure Value: -2 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Dianthus Macro

Dianthus Macro:
Dianthus Macro

This flower picture looks kind of surreal with the flower pistols protruding from the dianthus flower blossoms. A lot can be seen in floral macro photography, close exposures such as these open an entirely new world.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/45.3 Image Exposure Time: 1/2 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 271 mm Photo Exposure Value: -2 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Bobcat Hillside Snow Under Tree

Bobcat Hillside Snow Under Tree:
Bobcat Hillside Snow Under Tree

A grey and white bobcat under a pine tree. This wild cat looks like he is stalking his prey. The predator instincts in these animals are very evident in the way they walk and move.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/7 Image Exposure Time: 1/400 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 300 mm Film Speed ISO: 200 Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Focus Mode: AI Focus Lens Model: 70-300mm Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: High Photo White Balance: Auto Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander:


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Kaleidoscope Flowers

Kaleidoscope Flowers:
Kaleidoscope Flowers

Multiple colors abound in this kaleidoscope of flowers. The colors in the little flowers are quite vivid in this flower picture.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/20 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 209 mm Photo Exposure Value: -2 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Purple Daisies

Purple Daisies:
Purple Daisies

Purple Daisies in a flower field. These daisies are really pretty with a yellow center and purple pedals around the edges.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/8 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 248 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Large Red Daisy

Large Red Daisy:
Large Red Daisy

Colorful Large Red Daisy Flower. The soft colors and light shading are just right for this large red daisy flower.

    Picture Height: 2499 pixels Picture Width: 2602 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/8 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 105 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Blue Sky Shenandoah Valley

Blue Sky Shenandoah Valley:


Blue Sky Shenandoah Valley
Blue Sky Shenandoah Valley


A beautiful blue sky stretches across the Shenandoah Valley below. White puffy clouds float above the mountain tops, like balls of cotton between heaven and earth.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/8 Image Exposure Time: 1/250 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Focus Mode: AI Focus Lens Model: 28mm Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: High Photo White Balance: Auto Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander:


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

White Trillium Flower

White Trillium Flower:
White Trillium Flower

White Trillium Forest Flower. These flowers abound in the Mountains of West Virginia during the cool early spring days. They also display several other colors besides white.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 1/60 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 105 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Otter Playing Snow Sliding

Otter Playing Snow Sliding:
Otter Playing Snow Sliding

An otter running and then sliding down this hill in the snow. What a playful little fellow. He sure seems happy.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/5.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/250 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 105 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Pink Flowers

Pink Flowers:
Pink Flowers

Small Pink Flowers in a nicely composed vertical framed picture.

    Picture Height: 4380 pixels Picture Width: 3736 pixels Lens Aperture: f/22.6 Image Exposure Time: 1/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 218 mm Photo Exposure Value: -1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander;Troy Lilly ForestWander: ForestWander.com


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Country Road Autumn Mountain Sunset

Country Road Autumn Mountain Sunset:


Country Road Autumn Mountain Sunset
Country Road Autumn Mountain Sunset

If you look closely you can see the country road winding across the mountain side through the vibrant fall foliage. In the horizon the sun is setting in a colorful autumn sky.

    Camera Model: in-sunset ForestWander Nature Photography: :08:27 16:46:54 ForestWander: restWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Tree Foliage

Autumn Tree Foliage:

Perfect for a background or even a wall mural this autumn foliage picture was taken in the West Virginia mountains near the Cheat River. Small pine trees cover the base of the forest in this colorful fall foliage picture. It is said that there are a lot of black bear around this area, we are hoping to see one.  Picture Height: 2304 pixels Picture Width: 3456 pixels Lens Aperture: f/5 Image Exposure Time: 1/25 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography
Autumn Tree Foliage
Perfect for a background or even a wall mural this autumn foliage picture was taken in the West Virginia mountains near the Cheat River. Small pine trees cover the base of the forest in this colorful fall foliage picture. It is said that there are a lot of black bear around this area, we are hoping to see one.
    Picture Height: 2304 pixels Picture Width: 3456 pixels Lens Aperture: f/5 Image Exposure Time: 1/25 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Mountain Village Scene

Autumn Mountain Village Scene:


Just above Harmon West Virginia we find this quaint mountain village scene. In the peak of the fall foliage season the bright red colors throughout this valley seem to glow in the late evening sun.  Picture Height: 3000 pixels Picture Width: 4000 pixels Lens Aperture: f/3.5 Image Exposure Time: 8/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 18.89 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon PowerShot G9 Photo White Balance: 1 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography
Autumn Mountain Village Scene
Just above Harmon West Virginia we find this quaint mountain village scene. In the peak of the fall foliage season the bright red colors throughout this valley seem to glow in the late evening sun.
    Picture Height: 3000 pixels Picture Width: 4000 pixels Lens Aperture: f/3.5 Image Exposure Time: 8/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 18.89 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon PowerShot G9 Photo White Balance: 1 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

WV Fall Foliage Mountain Sunrise

WV Fall Foliage Mountain Sunrise:

WV Fall Foliage Mountain Sunrise
WV Fall Foliage Mountain Sunrise



Early in the morning from the top of Cheat Mountain in West Virginia. The early morning sunrise was beautiful this day and we are excited to go take some fall foliage pictures.

    Camera Model: -sunrise ForestWander Nature Photography: :08:27 09:45:49 ForestWander: restwander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Country Church

Autumn Country Church:

A small country church found in the mountains of West Virginia. On a clear autumn day the fall colors around this church accent the old fashioned charm of a little white church beside the road.  Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/8 Image Exposure Time: 1/160 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 35 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB
Autumn Country Church
A small country church found in the mountains of West Virginia. On a clear autumn day the fall colors around this church accent the old fashioned charm of a little white church beside the road.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/8 Image Exposure Time: 1/160 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 35 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Foliage Waterfall Sunset

Autumn Foliage Waterfall Sunset:


Autumn Foliage surrounds these beautiful waterfalls during a fall evening sunset sky. Blackwater falls are some of the most beautiful waterfalls in all of West Virginia. the river is known and named for the dark colored water stained from minerals in the river sediment.
Autumn Foliage Waterfall Sunset
Autumn Foliage surrounds these beautiful waterfalls during a fall evening sunset sky. Blackwater falls are some of the most beautiful waterfalls in all of West Virginia. the river is known and named for the dark colored water stained from minerals in the river sediment.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/14.1 Image Exposure Time: 30 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Photo Exposure Value: 0 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Foliage Morning Fog

Autumn Foliage Morning Fog:

Early morning fog slowly drifts across Summit Lake in the mountains of West Virginia on a cool Autumn morning. The colorful fall foliage is beginning to awake as the water reflects from the glassy still lake waters.  Picture Height: 3566 pixels Picture Width: 5363 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 1/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 32 mm Photo Exposure Value: 1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography
Autumn Foliage Morning Fog
Early morning fog slowly drifts across Summit Lake in the mountains of West Virginia on a cool Autumn morning. The colorful fall foliage is beginning to awake as the water reflects from the glassy still lake waters.
    Picture Height: 3566 pixels Picture Width: 5363 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 1/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 32 mm Photo Exposure Value: 1 EV Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Photo White Balance: 0 Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Mail Pouch Barn

Autumn Mail Pouch Barn:

A classic rural country scene of a mail pouch barn on a country farm. Behind the barn the fall foliage colors accent this down home country scene. ForestWander Nature Photography: :09:05 21:43:06 ForestWander: restWander.com
Autumn Mail Pouch Barn
A classic rural country scene of a mail pouch barn on a country farm. Behind the barn the fall foliage colors accent this down home country scene.
    ForestWander Nature Photography: :09:05 21:43:06 ForestWander: restWander.com


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Colorful Autumn Mountain

Colorful Autumn Mountain:

A Colorful Autumn Mountain covered in Fall Foliage. This was taken near the highland scenic highway late one autumn evening, under a cloudy blue sky. Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 3/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV Focus Mode: Single Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: Unknown Photo White Balance: Unknown Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Fall Pictures
Colorful Autumn Mountain
A Colorful Autumn Mountain covered in Fall Foliage. This was taken near the highland scenic highway late one autumn evening, under a cloudy blue sky.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 3/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV Focus Mode: Single Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: Unknown Photo White Balance: Unknown Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Fall Pictures


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Autumn Mountain Foliage

Autumn Mountain Foliage:

Autumn Mountain Foliage along the Highland Scenic Highway. Overcast days are the best time for fall foliage photography. The elevation on this highway is around 5000 feet above sea level and is a beautiful place to drive in the autumn season. Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 4/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV Focus Mode: Single Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: Unknown Photo White Balance: Unknown Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography
Autumn Mountain Foliage
Autumn Mountain Foliage along the Highland Scenic Highway. Overcast days are the best time for fall foliage photography. The elevation on this highway is around 5000 feet above sea level and is a beautiful place to drive in the autumn season.
    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/4 Image Exposure Time: 4/10 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 24 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: 1.33 EV Focus Mode: Single Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: Unknown Photo White Balance: Unknown Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: ForestWander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Nature Photography


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Fall Sunset Gristmill

Fall Sunset Gristmill:
Fall Sunset Gristmill

Late one autumn evening after sunset in the few minutes left before complete darkness, I captured this shot of the gristmill waterfalls of glade creek. The wind was blowing so it made the trees a little blurry however I still like this shot because it was taken in such low lighting. There are many great opportunities for fall foliage photography at Babcock state park in West Virginia.

    Picture Height: 3744 pixels Picture Width: 5616 pixels Lens Aperture: f/7 Image Exposure Time: 30 sec Lens Focal Length mm: 28 mm Film Speed ISO: 100 Photo Exposure Value: -0.67 EV Focus Mode: Single Camera Model: Canon EOS 5D Mark II Image Saturation Level: Unknown Photo White Balance: Unknown Color Space: sRGB ForestWander Nature Photography: Forestwander.com ForestWander: ForestWander Fall Pictures


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Monday, September 19, 2011

Music From The Universe & Across The Universe Beatles

Music From The Universe & Across The Universe Beatles







PICTURES OF NATURE & UNIVERSE PHOTOGRAPHY

Pequi

Pequi:
FernandoPaoliello postou uma foto:



Pequi



Fruto do Pequizeiro (Caryocar brasiliensis)


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE

Espiral adormecida.

Gavião

Outono chegando...

Príncipe Negro

Artesanato de Lagoa Santa, MG

Flor do Pequizeiro

Lichia

Lichia:
FernandoPaoliello postou uma foto:



Lichia



LITCHI CHINENSIS - FAMÍLIA SAPINDACEAE



Originária da China onde é considerada a fruta nacional, a lichieira e uma árvore subtropical com até 12 metros de altura e de grande longevidade. Em muitos países e considerada a rainha das frutas.


NATURE PICTURES & THE UNIVERSE